i ordered you a pancake.
Everything Is Art Interview with Brandon

fuckyeahincubus:

Brandon Boyd does not like to be “Googled,” and prefers to be called at his mother’s house While at a sorbet party. Good thing for EIA, we like sorbet, and who can resist a party with artists and creative people at it, anyway?

Setting: Imagine, if you will, a Non-Google, Sorbet Party with conversations, rather than questions, being fired. The walls are painted with flowing artwork – no creative blocks here. In the next room you can actually pick up a paintbrush and paint the ocean. As it comes to life, you surf with Brandon as your mind wanders off to the unknown, and you engage in an intellectual conversation about art and life.

Attire: relaxed and judgment free. Maybe a rock star, or maybe just an extremely creative person, who’s outlet has been through a little box that most of us hear our music from. Known as the lead singer of Incubus, Brandon Boyd is one of us, an artist, as we create whatever our mind wanders off to. Visually, Brandon’s artwork is as expressive as his lungs are with music. It opens the mind and looks into the soul for questions, inspiration, and a connection to life that all artists live for.

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jhnmyr:

“Queen of California” video animated via Draw Something.

A must-see. So great.

redvelvetteacake:

People say your work always has a nihilistic undertone to everything, but I find it’s not that the characters don’t care rather that they just don’t like the world they’re in and are forced to make a choice.There’s a quality to it I never really point out—it’s the quality of play. The idea of kind of making a game out of these things and playing them in a different way, not just accepting the game that you’re given by the culture but inventing your own. Something I always said about Fight Club: it is basically a game that people have invented and it’s fun. It’s not any kind of personal quest; it’s just a fun thing to do for a couple hours a week. Invisible Monsters was a book I had written just to have a really good time and it’s that quality of play that I always want to be present in everything I write.
I think you get a sense of that play because even in the darkest moments there’s so much comedy and humor. But it’s not in a way that’s just there to alleviate something; it’s just looking at life from a different perspective.So often when we generate comedy, we do it by presenting something very dramatic and to have one character not react appropriately—to react in a way that obscures the drama and that creates a laugh.
Did you think that the film adaptation of Fight Club was able to convey that sense of play? Yes, very much. The film carried that sense of play. It’s always hard in the third act to switch from that comic sense and have a character suddenly engage with the drama and be upset that the game has gone a little too far. It’s that turn that’s always the trickiest to do.
Chuck 

redvelvetteacake:

People say your work always has a nihilistic undertone to everything, but I find it’s not that the characters don’t care rather that they just don’t like the world they’re in and are forced to make a choice.
There’s a quality to it I never really point out—it’s the quality of play. The idea of kind of making a game out of these things and playing them in a different way, not just accepting the game that you’re given by the culture but inventing your own. Something I always said about 
Fight Club: it is basically a game that people have invented and it’s fun. It’s not any kind of personal quest; it’s just a fun thing to do for a couple hours a week. Invisible Monsters was a book I had written just to have a really good time and it’s that quality of play that I always want to be present in everything I write.

I think you get a sense of that play because even in the darkest moments there’s so much comedy and humor. But it’s not in a way that’s just there to alleviate something; it’s just looking at life from a different perspective.
So often when we generate comedy, we do it by presenting something very dramatic and to have one character not react appropriately—to react in a way that obscures the drama and that creates a laugh.

Did you think that the film adaptation of Fight Club was able to convey that sense of play? 
Yes, very much. The film carried that sense of play. It’s always hard in the third act to switch from that comic sense and have a character suddenly engage with the drama and be upset that the game has gone a little too far. It’s that turn that’s always the trickiest to do.

Chuck 

Who would have known how bittersweet this would taste?
Who would have known how bittersweet this would taste?

frenchcinema:

In Competition:“Amour” (dir. Michael Haneke)“The Angel’s Share” (dir. Ken Loach)“Baad EL Mawkeaa (Apres La Bataille”) (dir. Yousry Nasrallah)“Beyond The Hills” (dir. Cristian Mungiu)“Cosmopolis” (dir. David Cronenberg)“Holy Motors” (dir. Leos Carax)“The Hunt” (dir. Thomas Vinterberg)“In Another Country” (dir. Hong Sang-Soo)“Im Nebels (Dans La Brume)” (dir. Sergei Loznitsa)“Killing Them Softly” (dir. Andrew Dominik)“Lawless”  (dir. John Hillcoat)“Like Someone In Love” (dir. Abbas Kiarostami)“Moonrise Kingdom” (dir. Wes Anderson)“Mud” (dir. Jeff Nichols)“On The Road” (dir. Walter Salles)“Paradies: Liebe” (dir. Ulrich Seidl)“The Paperboy” (dir. Lee Daniels)“Post Tenebras Lux” (dir. Carlos Reygadas)“Reality” (dir. Matteo Garrone)“Rust & Bone” (dir. Jacques Audiard)“Taste Of Money” (dir. Im Sang-Soo)“Vous N’Avez Encoure Rien Vu” (dir. Alain Resnais)Opening Film:“Moonrise Kingdom” (dir. Wes Anderson)Closing Film:“Therese D.” (dir. Claude Miller)Un Certain Regard:“Miss Lovely” (dir. Ashim Ahluwalia)“La Playa” (dir. Juan Andres Arango)“Les Chevaus De Dieu” (dir. Nabil Ayouch)“Trois Mondes” (dir. Catheron Corsini)“Antiviral” (dir. Brandon Cronenberg)“7 Days In Havana” (dir. Benicio Del Toro, Laurent Cantet, Gaspar Noe etc)“Le Grand Soir” (dir. Benoit Delepine & Gustave Kervern)“Laurence Anyways” (dir. Xavier Dolan)“Despues De Lucia” (dir. Michel Franco)“Aimer A Perdre La Raison” (dir. Joachim Lafosse)“Mystery” (dir. Lou Ye)“Student” (dir. Darezhan Omirbayev)“La Pirogue” (dir. Moussa Toure)“Elefante Blanco” (dir. Pablo Trapero)“Confession Of A Child Of The Century” (dir. Sylvie Verheyde)“11.25: The Day He Chose His Own Fate” (dir. Koji Wakamatsu)“Beasts Of The Southern Wild” (dir. Benh Zeitlin)Out of Competition“Une Journee Particuliere” (dir. Gilles Jacob and Samuel Faure)“Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted” (dir. Eric Darnell, Tom McGrath)“Dario Argento’s Dracula” (dir. Dario Argento)“Io E Te” (dir. Bernardo Berolucci)“Hemingway & Gellhorn” (Dir. Philip Kaufman)“Ai To Makoto” (dir. Takashi Miike)Special Screening:“Der Mull Im Garten Eden” (dir. Faith Akin)“Mekong Hotel” (dir. Apichatpong Weerasethakul)“Villegas” (dir. Gonzalo Tobal)“A Musica Segundo Tom Jobim” (dir. Nelson Pereira Do Santos)“Journal De France” (dir. Claudine Nougaret & Raymond Depardon)“Les Invisbles” (dir. Sebastien Lifshitz)“The Central Park Five” (dir. Ken Burns, Sarah Burns, David McMahon)“Roman Polanski: A Film Memoir” (dir. Laurent Bouzereau)

frenchcinema:

In Competition:
“Amour” (dir. Michael Haneke)
“The Angel’s Share” (dir. Ken Loach)
“Baad EL Mawkeaa (Apres La Bataille”) (dir. Yousry Nasrallah)
“Beyond The Hills” (dir. Cristian Mungiu)
“Cosmopolis” (dir. David Cronenberg)
“Holy Motors” (dir. Leos Carax)
“The Hunt” (dir. Thomas Vinterberg)
“In Another Country” (dir. Hong Sang-Soo)
“Im Nebels (Dans La Brume)” (dir. Sergei Loznitsa)
“Killing Them Softly” (dir. Andrew Dominik)
“Lawless”  (dir. John Hillcoat)
“Like Someone In Love” (dir. Abbas Kiarostami)
“Moonrise Kingdom” (dir. Wes Anderson)
“Mud” (dir. Jeff Nichols)
“On The Road” (dir. Walter Salles)
“Paradies: Liebe” (dir. Ulrich Seidl)
“The Paperboy” (dir. Lee Daniels)
“Post Tenebras Lux” (dir. Carlos Reygadas)
“Reality” (dir. Matteo Garrone)
“Rust & Bone” (dir. Jacques Audiard)
“Taste Of Money” (dir. Im Sang-Soo)
“Vous N’Avez Encoure Rien Vu” (dir. Alain Resnais)

Opening Film:
“Moonrise Kingdom” (dir. Wes Anderson)

Closing Film:
“Therese D.” (dir. Claude Miller)

Un Certain Regard:
“Miss Lovely” (dir. Ashim Ahluwalia)
“La Playa” (dir. Juan Andres Arango)
“Les Chevaus De Dieu” (dir. Nabil Ayouch)
“Trois Mondes” (dir. Catheron Corsini)
“Antiviral” (dir. Brandon Cronenberg)
“7 Days In Havana” (dir. Benicio Del Toro, Laurent Cantet, Gaspar Noe etc)
“Le Grand Soir” (dir. Benoit Delepine & Gustave Kervern)
“Laurence Anyways” (dir. Xavier Dolan)
“Despues De Lucia” (dir. Michel Franco)
“Aimer A Perdre La Raison” (dir. Joachim Lafosse)
“Mystery” (dir. Lou Ye)
“Student” (dir. Darezhan Omirbayev)
“La Pirogue” (dir. Moussa Toure)
“Elefante Blanco” (dir. Pablo Trapero)
“Confession Of A Child Of The Century” (dir. Sylvie Verheyde)
“11.25: The Day He Chose His Own Fate” (dir. Koji Wakamatsu)
“Beasts Of The Southern Wild” (dir. Benh Zeitlin)

Out of Competition
“Une Journee Particuliere” (dir. Gilles Jacob and Samuel Faure)
“Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted” (dir. Eric Darnell, Tom McGrath)
“Dario Argento’s Dracula” (dir. Dario Argento)
“Io E Te” (dir. Bernardo Berolucci)
“Hemingway & Gellhorn” (Dir. Philip Kaufman)
“Ai To Makoto” (dir. Takashi Miike)

Special Screening:
“Der Mull Im Garten Eden” (dir. Faith Akin)
“Mekong Hotel” (dir. Apichatpong Weerasethakul)
“Villegas” (dir. Gonzalo Tobal)
“A Musica Segundo Tom Jobim” (dir. Nelson Pereira Do Santos)
“Journal De France” (dir. Claudine Nougaret & Raymond Depardon)
“Les Invisbles” (dir. Sebastien Lifshitz)
“The Central Park Five” (dir. Ken Burns, Sarah Burns, David McMahon)
“Roman Polanski: A Film Memoir” (dir. Laurent Bouzereau)

obliteratedheart:

Russian artist Dmitry Maximov,  created this fascinating set called, Invaded by Little Aliens. Using a mix of photography and illustration to create micro worlds, centered of solitude, where strange creatures seem to explore the world. (via koikoikoi)

prostheticknowledge:

Researchers show that memories reside in specific brain cells 
From MIT News - Simply activating a tiny number of neurons can conjure an entire memory:

Our fond or fearful memories — that first kiss or a bump in the night — leave memory traces that we may conjure up in the remembrance of things past, complete with time, place and all the sensations of the experience. Neuroscientists call these traces memory engrams. But are engrams conceptual, or are they a physical network of neurons in the brain? In a new MIT study, researchers used optogenetics to show that memories really do reside in very specific brain cells, and that simply activating a tiny fraction of brain cells can recall an entire memory — explaining, for example, how Marcel Proust could recapitulate his childhood from the aroma of a once-beloved madeleine cookie.“We demonstrate that behavior based on high-level cognition, such as the expression of a specific memory, can be generated in a mammal by highly specific physical activation of a specific small subpopulation of brain cells, in this case by light,” says Susumu Tonegawa, the Picower Professor of Biology and Neuroscience at MIT and lead author of the study reported online today in the journal Nature. “This is the rigorously designed 21st-century test of Canadian neurosurgeon Wilder Penfield’s early-1900s accidental observation suggesting that mind is based on matter.”

Read more at MIT News here
(Image - An image of a transgenic mouse hippocampus | Image: Nikon Small World Gallery)

prostheticknowledge:

Researchers show that memories reside in specific brain cells 

From MIT News - Simply activating a tiny number of neurons can conjure an entire memory:

Our fond or fearful memories — that first kiss or a bump in the night — leave memory traces that we may conjure up in the remembrance of things past, complete with time, place and all the sensations of the experience. Neuroscientists call these traces memory engrams.

But are engrams conceptual, or are they a physical network of neurons in the brain? In a new MIT study, researchers used optogenetics to show that memories really do reside in very specific brain cells, and that simply activating a tiny fraction of brain cells can recall an entire memory — explaining, for example, how Marcel Proust could recapitulate his childhood from the aroma of a once-beloved madeleine cookie.

“We demonstrate that behavior based on high-level cognition, such as the expression of a specific memory, can be generated in a mammal by highly specific physical activation of a specific small subpopulation of brain cells, in this case by light,” says Susumu Tonegawa, the Picower Professor of Biology and Neuroscience at MIT and lead author of the study reported online today in the journal Nature. “This is the rigorously designed 21st-century test of Canadian neurosurgeon Wilder Penfield’s early-1900s accidental observation suggesting that mind is based on matter.”

Read more at MIT News here

(Image - An image of a transgenic mouse hippocampus | Image: Nikon Small World Gallery)